The fox is in danger of becoming extinct. In many regions of the world,
the fox is being hunted for furs. Some kinds of foxes, especially the
Arctic fox and the red fox have long, soft fur that is highly valued.
People trap foxes for their fur, and also raise the animals on fur farms.
Foxes live together in family groups; they play together and cooperate
when being hunted. If one of a pair of foxes is chased by an enemy, its
mate will dash out of a hiding place and lead the pursuer astray. Enemies
of the red fox are wolves, coyotes and bobcats. In desert lands, their
enemies are wild dogs, large cats, hyenas and cougars. Other vicious
animals will sometimes attack a weak or sick fox. All species of foxes are
known for their cleverness in escaping their predators.

Foxes are curious and have little fear of people, so they are easily killed.
In the 1800s, they were considered pests, so they were trapped,
poisoned and hunted. Hundreds of foxes were destroyed accidentally
during predator control programs aimed at removing wolves, coyotes,
and ground squirrels from the prairies in the 1900s. Some people
continue to mistake them for young coyotes and kill them. Habitat loss
due to agricultural, industrial, and urban developments also reduced
their numbers. Dens were ploughed over, and native grasses replaced
with tall cereal crops that are unsuitable for foxes and for their food.

Most people hunted the fox for game because of its skill in trying to
avoid capture. Fox hunting was a very popular sport in England, where
they chased a fox for miles on horses using dogs to track the scent of
the fox. The fox would sometimes double back on its tail or run into
water, making its scent difficult to follow. Many hunters wanted only
the excitement of the chase, and they usually didn’t kill the fox. Fox
hunting is now banned  in England, and in many hunts dogs cannot be
used.

The painting of
The Red Fox of Brookdale was based on a family of foxes
that lived on the Brookdale Golf Course near Tacoma, WA.
All profits from the sale of
these prints will be donated to
Fox Wood Wildlife Rescue in
East Concord, New York.
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No Unauthorized Usage Without Permission From the Artist. All Rights Reserved.
The Red Fox of Brookdale
2006
Endangered Species / Animals at Risk
Original 11"x15", Pastel on Velour Paper.
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